Latina Empowerment Through Leadership

;” ethnic minorities can be considered exotic because they are different, reinforcing the idea that being white or having white features is the norm in the United States. Even if an ethnic minority is white-passing, when their nationality is revealed it may heighten their sexual appeal to people that value exoticism. The television and movie industry in America is dominated by white men who often portray ethnic minorities from a white point of view. Specifically, Latin American women in the American mainstream media are exoticised and hypersexualized. From Naya Rivera’s role asSantana LopezonGleeto Shakira and Jennifer Lopez’s somewhat infamous music videos toshameless advertisements, it’s not hard to find examples of thesexualization of Latina womenin pop culture.

The Series emphasis is in creating a solid business foundation that will allow Latinas to take their business to the next level. We relied on self-report data, had a relatively short follow-up, were unable to assess condom use by partner type, and lacked objective and quantifiable biological outcomes, such as incident sexually transmitted infections, to assess intervention efficacy. Future trials of HIV interventions conducted with ethnically diverse samples of Latina women would benefit by addressing these limitations. bAdjusted for baseline value of the outcome variable and having health insurance; comparison intervention was the referent for computing the AOR. To assess the efficacy of AMIGAS, we surveyed participants at baseline and at 3- and 6-month postintervention follow-ups.

But there’s a more insidious side to this kind of stereotyping — besides being inaccurate, these types of depictions have been used to blame high rates of teen pregnancies in the community on the « spicy Latina. » Though theCenter for American Progressreports that the level of educational attainment for Latinas has risen in the past few years, graduation rates for Latinas, at 31.3% in 2008, are still significantly lower than graduation rates for white women, at 45.8%. Driven largely by the War on Drugs, women of color, particularly black and Latina women, comprise the fastest-growing sector of the prison population. In the last 20 years, thenumber of womenincarcerated increased at a rate almost double that of men, with Latina women being 69% more likely to be incarcerated than white women. Although feminists regularly cite the gender wage gap as a scourge holding back women in the workplace, in fact for Latinas, the gap is much worse.

Among those 24% who have a preference for a pan-ethnic label, « ‘Hispanic’ is preferred over ‘Latino’ by more than a two-to-one margin—33% versus 14%. » 21% prefer to be referred to simply as « Americans. » The Hispanic Society of America is dedicated to the study of the arts and cultures of Spain, Portugal, and Latin America. The 2010 Census asked if the person was « Spanish/Hispanic/Latino ». The modern term to identify Portuguese and Spanish territories under a single nomenclature is « Iberian », and the one to refer to cultures derived from both countries in the Americas is « Iberian-American ».

In other words, if you compare the genomes of people from different parts of the world, there are no genetic variants that occur in all members of one racial group but not in another. Europeans and Asians, for instance, share almost the same set of genetic variations. As Jablonski described earlier, the racial groupings we have invented are actually genetically more similar to each other than they are different — meaning there’s no way to definitively separate people into races according to their biology. The effects of this history prevail today — even in current definitions of race, where there’s still an underlying assumption that traits like skin color or hair texture have biological, genetic underpinnings that are completely unique to different racial groups. The idea of « race » originated from anthropologists and philosophers in the 18th century, who used geographical location and phenotypic traits like skin color to place people into different racial groupings.

I enjoyed every story being told and I can take away something from each person. It’s nice to see what women can accomplish when we all collaborate for a purpose. Launched in 1998, the LATINA Style http://www.angoram.com/?p=24105 Business Series is the most successful business development program for Latina Business owners in the nation. The Series has visited 136 cities with over 38,000 women participating in the program.

Additionally, we could not measure lifetime exposure to abuse with the WEB. Thus, the Any IPV (BRFSS and/or WEB) and the WEB rows of the table are not included for lifetime exposure. To establish period-prevalence for each type of IPV assessed by the BRFSS questions, women were first asked if they ever experienced each particular abuse type since age 18; if they had, they were asked if the abuse occurred during the past 5 years, and during the past year. To further comment on the type of abuse women reported, we defined two categories of abuse based on the BRFSS questions. Women were defined as having experienced “physical IPV” if they reported physical and/or sexual abuse, and they were defined as having experienced “psychological IPV” if they reported threats and/or controlling behavior.

Likewise, southern Louisiana is home to communities of people of Canary Islands descent, known as Isleños, in addition to other people of Spanish ancestry. Paraguayan25,0220.0All other1,800,2993.0Total59,763,631100.0As of 2018, approximately 62% of the nation’s Hispanic population were of Mexican origin . Another 9.6% were of Puerto Rican origin, with about 4% each of Cuban and Salvadoran and 3.4% Dominican origins. The remainder were of other Central American or of South American origin, or of origin directly from Spain. Two thirds of all Hispanic and Latino Americans were born in the United States.

The U.S. States where Puerto Ricans were the largest Hispanic group were New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Hawaii. U.S. states with higher percentages of Puerto Ricans then the national average (1.5%) as of 2010, are Connecticut (7.1%), New York (5.5%), New Jersey (4.9%), Florida (4.5%), Massachusetts (4.1%), Rhode Island (3.3%), Hawaii (3.2%), Pennsylvania (2.9%) and Delaware (2.5%). Orlando and the surrounding area has had a sizable Puerto Rican population since the 1980s, as Florida as a whole has always had a decent sized Puerto Rican population. A big contributing factor for the growth of the Puerto Rican community in Central Florida was Walt Disney World, who heavily recruited employees in Puerto Rico. Central Florida’s Puerto Rican population began to skyrocket starting in the early 2000s and accelerating in the 2010s, with many New Yorkers of Puerto Rican ancestry moving to Florida, joining the island-born Puerto Ricans.

Under this definition a Mexican American or Puerto Rican, for example, is both a Hispanic and a Latino. A Brazilian American is also a Latino by this definition, which includes those of Portuguese-speaking origin from Latin America. Similarly, and by the same reasoning, French-Americans, Italian-Americans and Romanian-Americans are also all considered Latino.

In log points, the aggregation of the Hispanic woman penalty and the white man premium is equivalent to the total white-men-to-Hispanic-women gap, and their relative magnitudes can be used to calculate the percentage point contribution of each component to the aggregate gap. Importantly, both models confirm the empirical evidence presented by Paul, Zaw, Hamilton, and Darity of the role of intersectionality in the labor market. Specifically, Hispanic women’s total wage gap (40 percent, as calculated with Paul et al.’s specification) is larger than the addition of their gender wage gap with Hispanic men and their ethnic wage gap with white women . Depressed labor force participation and work hours bring down earnings for individual Hispanic women workers and may also contribute to a more precarious and anti-competitive labor market for all workers.

Population Growth Rate

The legacy of racial categories has also shaped society in ways that have resulted in vastly different socioeconomic realities for different groups. That’s reflected, for instance, in higher levels of poverty for minority groups, poorer access to education and health care, and greater exposure to crime, environmental injustices and other social ills. What’s more, race is still used by some as the motivation for continued discrimination against other groups that are deemed to be « inferior. » « Our research has revealed that the same or similar skin colors — both light and dark — have evolved multiple times under similar solar conditions in our history, » she said.

Indeed, Sotomayor became the first Latina Supreme Court Justice in U.S. history. During her time in the Supreme Court, Sotomayor has worked tirelessly to be a voice for women and ethnic minorities in criminal justice reform. Here we take a look at a handful of the inspiring Latinas who have made history, shaped the society we live in, and changed our world for the better. The health status of Latino immigrant women in the United States and future health policy implication of the affordable care act.

Revenue for Latina-owned businesses grows at about 9.5 percent per year. As of 2013, Latinas owned about 1 out of every 10 women-owned businesses. Latina women represented 49 percent of all Latinos who matriculated into medical school in 2004. From 1980 to 2004, the number of Latina medical school graduates per year jumped from 93 to 485. Only 3 percent of Latina women are represented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, or STEM, fields, while women in total make up 24 percent of the STEM workforce.

Health Associated With Intimate Partner Violence History

The Institute for Women’s Policy Research shows in a study in 2008, that Latina immigrants residing in Phoenix, Northern Virginia, and Atlanta all have a lower high school completion rates when compared to their male Latino immigrant counterparts. Latinas also fall behind Latino immigrants in their likelihood to attend 1–4 years of college. However, in Northern Virginia and Atlanta a higher percentage of Latina women complete 5+ years of college than Latino men do. Latina immigrants also lack a « substantial amount » of English proficiency, as discovered in IWPR’s 2008 research.